Inspirations

Suppose you go in search of a book in a library in pitch darkness, can you find it without light?

Although you, the subject, 
and the book, the object, 
are both present?
Light has to be present to unite you.
This link between the subject and the object in every experience
is chit, consciousness.
It is both the substratum as well as the witness of the experience.


  ~ Ramana Maharishi

Testimonials

My personal appreciation of visual works of art have always hinged on a intricate experience of content, intent, and objectivity. The themes of the greatest works of art are love, death, and human fate, and works that skillfully represent or emote passions on those themes are the first to catch my attention. As I linger to absorb or comprehend the content of a work that appeals to aspects of my essential human nature, I naturally begin to wonder about the intentions of the artist. I cannot, for long, keep aesthetic appreciation separate from the understanding that works of art are also windows into the mind of another human being. And, more specifically, the mind of that individual artist that has found an inspiration to share, and a talent with which to do so. After that communion with the artist has been realized, that subjective experience starts to move into a more objective one. Does the piece inspire me in a profound way, a universal way, towards something meaningful?  I will never forget the first Ajay Gulati painting that I saw. A chiseled, sculpted red temple, perched on a staircase that infinitely ascends into an intense, brilliant red horizon. The painting moved me, like nothing had in a long time. So much so, that I was compelled to seek out more of his works, and ultimately, the artist himself. That red painting was never far from my thoughts, as I escaped the confines of my tedious and unfulfilling career as an MNC Corporate Manager, and moved onto an unknown, but excitement illuminated path of representing an Artist. I have now represented Ajay Gulati for over six years, arranging and curating exhibitions in India and throughout the world.  The content of Ajay Gulati's paintings are skillfully executed to transfer simple sentiments. Sculpted, tangible foregrounds that guide you  past the material, and towards ethereal skies and shining beacons of light that radiate from the center of the paintings. The execution is, like the belief expressed, uncomplicated. While curating exhibitions in Denmark and San Francisco, I have witnessed small children, drawn to the works, explain the meaning of the paintings to their parents.  Denis Dutton, a professor of philosophy of art at the University of Canterbury, has said, "Authenticity, which in the arts, means at the most profound level communion with another human soul, is something we are destined by evolution to want from literature, painting, and the other arts. This sense of communion exhilarates and elevates the spirit." Through his work, Ajay Gulati's intent, and purpose are clear. He believes that beauty exists. He believes in an objective truth. He believes in what he creates. And the dialogue created through his work, does indeed, elevate the spirit.  By Nicole Sottung, Artist Manager and Representative (2004 - 2012)  

My personal appreciation of visual works of art have always hinged on a intricate experience of content, intent, and objectivity. The themes of the greatest works of art are love, death, and human fate, and works that skillfully represent or emote passions on those themes are the first to catch my attention. As I linger to absorb or comprehend the content of a work that appeals to aspects of my essential human nature, I naturally begin to wonder about the intentions of the artist. I cannot, for long, keep aesthetic appreciation separate from the understanding that works of art are also windows into the mind of another human being. And, more specifically, the mind of that individual artist that has found an inspiration to share, and a talent with which to do so. After that communion with the artist has been realized, that subjective experience starts to move into a more objective one. Does the piece inspire me in a profound way, a universal way, towards something meaningful? 

I will never forget the first Ajay Gulati painting that I saw. A chiseled, sculpted red temple, perched on a staircase that infinitely ascends into an intense, brilliant red horizon. The painting moved me, like nothing had in a long time. So much so, that I was compelled to seek out more of his works, and ultimately, the artist himself. That red painting was never far from my thoughts, as I escaped the confines of my tedious and unfulfilling career as an MNC Corporate Manager, and moved onto an unknown, but excitement illuminated path of representing an Artist. I have now represented Ajay Gulati for over six years, arranging and curating exhibitions in India and throughout the world. 

The content of Ajay Gulati's paintings are skillfully executed to transfer simple sentiments. Sculpted, tangible foregrounds that guide you  past the material, and towards ethereal skies and shining beacons of light that radiate from the center of the paintings. The execution is, like the belief expressed, uncomplicated. While curating exhibitions in Denmark and San Francisco, I have witnessed small children, drawn to the works, explain the meaning of the paintings to their parents. 

Denis Dutton, a professor of philosophy of art at the University of Canterbury, has said, "Authenticity, which in the arts, means at the most profound level communion with another human soul, is something we are destined by evolution to want from literature, painting, and the other arts. This sense of communion exhilarates and elevates the spirit." Through his work, Ajay Gulati's intent, and purpose are clear. He believes that beauty exists. He believes in an objective truth. He believes in what he creates. And the dialogue created through his work, does indeed, elevate the spirit. 

By Nicole Sottung, Artist Manager and Representative (2004 - 2012)